How many people in Brazil are Christians?

How many people in Brazil are Christians?

22.2 percent of the remaining population identify with a Protestant tradition, including Seventh-day Adventists (6.5 percent), the Assembly of God (2.0 percent), the Christian Congregation of Brazil (1.2 percent), the Universal Kingdom of God (1.0 percent), and other types of Protestantism (11.5 percent ). A further 4.9 percent are considered to be non-religious.

Additionally, 0.7 percent are Catholics; this includes members of religious communities such as Jesuits and Carmelites as well as individuals who have only recently joined churches. Finally, 6.4 percent of the population has no religion.

In terms of actual numbers, around 70 million people live in Brazil. Of these, about 45 million are considered to be Christian, meaning that more than two-thirds of the population are not believed to read the Bible or attend church on a regular basis.

Although most South Americans are Catholic, that is not true of Brazil. Instead, it is one of the most secular countries in the world with an estimated 70 percent of the population following some sort of spiritual practice such as yoga, shamanism, or Catholicism.

However, things are beginning to change. Since 2000, evangelical Christianity has seen its number of followers increase by nearly 3 million people, bringing their total number of followers to 22 million.

What is the percentage of religion in Brazil?

Protestant 22.2 percent (includes Adventist 6.5 percent, Assembly of God 2.0 percent, Christian Congregation of Brazil 1.2 percent, Universal Kingdom of God 1.0 percent, other Protestant 11.5 percent), other Christian 0.7 percent, Spiritist 2.2 percent, other 1.4 percent, none 8 percent, unspecified 0.4 percent (2010 est.).

Religion has been a major factor in the history of Brazil. With more than 80 million people, it is the largest country in Latin America and the fifth most populous in the world. It borders four continents and lies between the Atlantic and South American oceans. Brazil was discovered by Europeans in 1500 and they controlled much of the land until the late 19th century, when it became a nation under its own government. Although there is no single official religion, Christianity is widely accepted as important to the culture and daily life of the majority of the population. About 90 percent of the people are considered Christians, mostly Roman Catholics, but also members of other churches including Protestants, Evangelicals, and Orthodox Christians. In addition, there are small numbers of Jews, Muslims, Buddhists, and Hindus.

In 2010, the most recent year for which data is available from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics, 22.2 percent of the population said they were religious and used this term in answering questions about themselves. This includes 14.8 percent who identified themselves as Catholic and 7.4 percent who said they were Protestant.

How many religions are there in Brazil?

Protestant 22.2 percent (includes Adventist 6.5 percent, Assembly of God 2.0 percent, Christian Congregation of Brazil 1.2 percent, Universal Kingdom of God 1.0 percent, other Protestant 11.5 percent), other Christian 0.7 percent, Spiritist 2.2 percent, other 1.4 percent, none 8 percent, unspecified 0.4 percent (2010 est.)

Protestant 22.2 percent (includes Adventist 6.5 percent, Assembly of God 2.0 percent, Christian Congregation of Brazil 1.2 percent, Universal Kingdom of God 1.0 percent, other Protestant 11.5 percent), other Christian 0.7 percent, Spiritist 2.2 percent, other 1.4 percent, none 8 percent, unspecified 0.4 percent (2010 est.)

What percent of Cameroon is Catholic?

55.5 percent of Christians are Catholic, 38 percent are Protestant, and 6.5 percent belong to other Christian faiths such as Jehovah's Witnesses and Orthodox churches.

There are also many individuals who identify themselves as spiritual but not religious.

According to a 2012 survey conducted by Georgetown University's Center for Public Christianity, 55 percent of Cameroon's estimated 11 million people are Christian, with 35 percent declaring no religion as their guiding philosophy. A further 5 percent are Muslim.

Almost all (96%) of Cameroon's citizens are considered ethnic English speakers, with French being the second most spoken language.

Catholicism has been present in Cameroon since the 16th century, when Portuguese missionaries arrived to trade gold and ivory. In 1534, King John III of Portugal issued a decree granting indigenous peoples freedom of religion, and allowing them to choose whether to convert to Catholicism or remain under the authority of the Church of England.

This decree proved very influential, as it allowed indigenous peoples in Brazil, Mexico, South America, and elsewhere to accept or reject the teachings of Rome, without fear of persecution.

Cameroon was one of several countries where large numbers of natives converted to Catholicism.

About Article Author

Charlene Hess

Charlene Hess is an expert on military and veteran affairs. She has served in the Marine Corps for over 20 years, achieving the rank of Corporal. She is now retired and enjoys sharing her knowledge of military life with others through writing articles and giving speeches on the subject.

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