What are the two forms of Philippine citizenship?

What are the two forms of Philippine citizenship?

There are two (2) commonly accepted methods of obtaining Philippine citizenship: The legal theory of jus soli (right of soil), which states that a person's nationality at birth is established by the location of birth (e.g., the territory of a given state). The legal theory of jus sanguinis (right of blood), which states that a person's nationality at birth is determined by the place of residence of the parents at the time of birth (e.g., the country where the father was born and lived until age 18).

The following individuals were all born in the Philippines but acquired their passports from other countries: American military personnel who were stationed here during World War II. They were given Philippine citizenship when they returned to the United States, but this document cannot be used as proof of Philippine citizenship for visa or entry requirements to the Philippines or any other country.

The following individuals were all born in the Philippines and have valid documents certifying their Philippine citizenship: A person is considered to have one Philippine citizen parent if he/she has a father or mother who is a Filipino and who was born in the Philippines or who came to the Philippines from another country with a valid passport.

A person is considered to have two Philippine citizen parents if he/she has two Filipino parents who were born in the Philippines or who came to the Philippines from another country with valid passports.

What is the Philippines's citizenship called?

Because Philippine citizenship is founded on the principles of jus sanguinis (Latin for "right of blood"), descent from a parent who is a citizen or national of the Republic of the Philippines is the primary route of attaining Philippine citizenship. Other routes include marriage to a citizen, long-term residency, and certain performances such as serving in the military or performing humanitarian work.

There is no requirement that one must be born within the boundaries of the Philippines to be a Filipino citizen.

Any person born within the territory of the Philippines, except for islands not inhabited by any nation, has automatic Philippine citizenship. However, one cannot become a citizen by birth alone; one must also have at least one parent who is a citizen by birth. If one parent is a citizen by naturalization, then the child will be considered a citizen by birth even if the other parent is not a citizen.

Furthermore, even if both parents are non-citizens, the child will still be a Filipino citizen if he/she was born within the Philippines. This means that even if you were born in the United States to Filipino parents, you would still be a Filipino citizen by birth.

What is a dual citizenship example?

Those born in foreign countries to Filipino fathers and/or mothers who follow the principle of jus soli, which gives them dual citizenship by birth; for example, the Philippines follows jus sanguinis, which means that any child born to Filipino parent/s, regardless of location, is automatically considered a Filipino citizen. However, children who were born to a Filipino father and a foreign mother or father cannot claim filipino citizenship because filipinos only grant citizenship to those who are born within our borders.

Example: Let's say that Maria is born in the Philippines to Filipino parents. Because her parents are Filipino, she is also granted Philippine citizenship at birth. But what if her father was not Filipino? Well, in this case, she would not be granted Philippine citizenship because she was not born in the Philippines. However, Maria's father could apply for a passport for her when she reaches the age of 18. If he gets permission from the Philippine government, she will then be able to travel with him overseas.

If Maria's father was already a citizen of another country, she would be able to travel with him there too. So in conclusion, Maria has dual citizenship by virtue of being born in the Philippines and to Filipino parents.

About Article Author

Diana Lama

Diana Lama is a freelance writer and editor who loves to write about all things law and crime. She has been published in The Huffington Post, Vice Magazine, and The Daily Beast, among other publications. She has a degree in criminal justice from California Polytechnic State University, and enjoys reading about other cases that shake up the justice system.

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