When did Warrington South become a swing seat?

When did Warrington South become a swing seat?

Since 2001, the district has been a marginal seat as well as a swing seat, since its winner's majority has not exceeded 7.5 percent of the vote since the 16.3 percent majority achieved that year. Since then, the seat has changed hands three times. In 2005, John Cryer won by just over 1,000 votes after standing as an independent following his defeat in the previous election. He was re-elected in 2008 with a much larger margin. In 2010, he lost again by about 1,500 votes to Chris Bryant.

Nowadays, the race is seen as too close to call. The latest polling shows Labour and the Conservatives tied at 20 percent each. The Liberal Democrats are on 10 percent while the Greens and others together account for less than 10 percent. When last held in 2005, the seat had been predicted by most observers to go to the Conservative candidate Alan Bown. However, John Cryer managed to overturn this result by turning out many more voters than expected. His victory was particularly surprising because it was thought that local issues would be important in such a safe seat. Indeed, one argument used by supporters of Mr. Bryant is that there were large numbers of absentees and illegal immigrants voting in 2005 but not in 2010, when they could no longer do so. However, the fact remains that Mr. Cryer's win can be explained by the same factors which have made the seat so unpredictable in the past.

Where is the constituency of Warrington South located?

It includes the portions of the town south of the Mersey, such as Appleton, Grappenhall, and Stockton Heath, as well as the town center and the Penketh and Sankey regions in the west. The settlement of Lymm is also included.

Since 2001, the seat has been a marginal seat as well as a swing seat, as its winner's majority has not exceeded 7.5 percent of the vote since the 16.3 percent majority won that year. Since then, the seat has changed hands three times.

When did Derby North become a swing seat?

Since 2001, the constituency has been a marginal seat as well as a swing seat, with its winner's majority not exceeding 8.6 percent of the vote since the 15.9 percent majority achieved in that year's general election. Since then, the seat has changed hands thrice.

Derby North (/'da: rbi/) is a constituency in Derby that has been represented in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom Parliament since 2019 by Conservative Amanda Solloway. The seat was a bellwether between 1983 and 2005; in 2010 and 2017, it leaned more to the left than the national outcome.

Derby was a former Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom. It was a House of Commons constituency of the Parliament of England from 1707 to 1800, then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1800 to 1801 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1950. It was represented in parliament by two MPs.

Derby was a former Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom. It was a House of Commons constituency of the Parliament of England from 1707 to 1800, then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1800 to 1801 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1950.

When did I win the seat of Mid Worcestershire?

In November 2013, I was chosen as the Conservative Party's parliamentary candidate for Mid Worcestershire in an open primary (a public gathering attended and voted on by both Conservative and non-Conservative supporters), and I won the seat with a majority of 20,532 in the May 2015 General Election.

It encompassed the towns of Droitwich and Redditch to the north of Worcester.

When did the Bilston constituency become part of Wolverhampton South East?

The seat was abolished in the general election in February 1974, when it was mostly replaced by the new Wolverhampton South East constituency. The constituency included the cities of Bilston, Coseley, and Sedgley at the time. Bilston became a municipal borough in 1950.

The Conservatives reclaimed the seat in 2010, only for Labour to reclaim it in the 2015 general election, and then for the Conservatives to reclaim it in 2019.

When did the Conservatives regain Wolverhampton South West?

The Conservatives reclaimed the seat in 2010, only for Labour to reclaim it in the 2015 general election, and then for the Conservatives to reclaim it in 2019.

Wolverhampton was represented by a single constituency that sent two members to Parliament from 1832 until 1885. William Wolryche-Whitmore (1832–1835)Richard Fryer (1832–1835) Sir Charles Pelham Villiers (1835–1855), a well-known free trader and Parliament's longest-serving member,

The Conservatives reclaimed the seat in 2010, only for Labour to reclaim it in the 2015 general election, and then for the Conservatives to reclaim it in 2019.

When did Labour win the seat of Walton?

Despite the fact that Labour has won more than 70% of the vote in the Walton constituency at every general election since 1992, it was long seen as a relatively safe Conservative seat. Until 1964, Labour had only won Walton once, in a landslide victory following the end of World War II in 1945.

53deg26'49"N 2deg58'01"W/53.47 degN 2.967 degW/53.47; -2.967 Since 2017, Dan Carden of the Labour Party has represented Liverpool Walton in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom Parliament. In June 2017, Carden received the greatest percentage of the vote of any of the 650 seats, 85.7 percent. It is the safest Labour seat in the country.

When was the seat of South Northamptonshire created?

The seat, one of many built in 1918, was a smaller version of the earliest in South Northamptonshire and lasted 32 years before reverting to "South Northamptonshire." Finally, in 1974, the majority of today's seat was formed from the north of the South Northants constituency.

(May 20, 2021) Since 2010, Chris Heaton-Harris of the Conservative Party has represented Daventry in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom Parliament.

Following the formation of the new South Northamptonshire seat in the 2005 general election, Daventry had substantial boundary modifications. The 2010 general election results were based on the notional results for the altered borders. Another general election has to be held before the end of 1940.

Daventry and Brackley Boroughs, the Rural Districts of Brackley, Crick, Daventry, Hardingstone, Middleton, Cheney, Potterspury, and Towcester, and a portion of the Rural District of Northampton 1974-1983: Daventry and Brackley Boroughs, as well as the rural districts of Brackley, Brixworth, Daventry, Northampton, and Towcester.

The seat, one of many built in 1918, was a smaller version of the earliest in South Northamptonshire and lasted 32 years before reverting to "South Northamptonshire." Finally, in 1974, the majority of today's seat was formed from the north of the South Northants constituency.

About Article Author

Maude Grant

Maude Grant has been working in the media for over 10 years. She is a journalist who writes about the issues that people face in today's world. In her journalism, she has looked at everything from climate change to gentrification to gun violence.

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